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A San Diego Doctor's Tips for Getting Through the Covid-19 Crisis in a Healthy and Sane Way

The medical community in San Diego is facing a huge challenge, and we need as many wellness ambassadors like yourselves to help.

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March 13, 2020
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Photo by Khamkhor on Unsplash

Angie Neison, MD is a Family Medicine and Culinary Medicine Physician in San Diego County, and she has a few tips for staying healthy in mind and body.

WHAT TO DO

Take a mindful approach to the current situation.

1. Most of us will be spending more time at home in the next few days or weeks ,so now is our time to do all the things we said we would do when we have "time". Take it as an opportunity to slow down.

2. As a culinary medicine physician, I recommend patients start cooking more at home. It's the perfect time to try new recipes, like the ones found right here on EdibleSanDiego.com

3. Limit your exposure to news and social media. It's important to stay informed, but it is all too easy to get sucked into the panic of the news cycle. Take a break and focus on being present and enjoying activities like reading, gardening, catching up on sleep, walking your dog, or doing a closet detox.

4. Find the silver lining. This crisis is a great reminder to be grateful for our health and to pause and enjoy taking care of ourselves, our family, and our homes.

WHAT NOT TO DO

There are still some basic precautions we all should be taking to help support public health.

1. Do not assume that someone who is well is 100% well. Many infected patients have a period of asymptomatic viral shedding where they can still be contagious. Try not to spend as much time in crowded public places as a way to help slow the spread of this very contagious virus.

2. Don't rush to urgent care or the hospital. There is currently limited testing available (as of 3/12/20), so if you have any symptoms related to COVID-19, first call or send a message via a secured portal to your physician office and self-quarantine yourself somewhere in your home. Doctors are working hard to call patients or do telemedicine visits and limit in-person visit. For severe symptoms, higher level care may be needed, but it is important to call ahead so the hospital can take appropriate precautions for your visit.

3. Don't panic. We are all in this together as a global community, and we will get through it. In the meantime, be kind to one another and take care of yourself and your family.

About the Author

Dr. Angelica Neison is a Family Physician with Sharp Rees-Stealy. She is currently pursuing studies in Culinary Medicine to help promote food as medicine to prevent and potentially reverse chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.  

Her passion is to improve the culinary literacy of her patients, and Sharp Rees-Stealy recently approved special extended appointments in which she has the opportunity to teach culinary medicine through hands-on cooking.

For more culinary tips, follow Dr. Neison @Flavors4WellnessMD.

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